TreeClicks: combating climate change via the digital highway

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It is currently raining initiatives to reduce our CO2 emissions and limit our influence on climate change. That is not surprising, because we are all starting to notice the effects of that climate change, in the form of, for example, more extreme weather and all the negative consequences that entails. One of the most notable initiatives to combat climate change is TreeClicks. This website promises that you can contribute to the fight against climate change by shopping online. We found out for you how that works and, more importantly, whether you should use TreeClicks.

Do something instead of letting it go

Swiss scientists published a startling report in July 2019 with a refreshing look at climate change and what humanity could do to combat it. Their proposal had never been suggested before and made headlines worldwide: just plant one trillion trees and your CO2 problem is solved. Instead of reducing emissions, it was argued, we could also intervene rigorously and ensure that excess carbon dioxide is reduced more quickly. And you need trees for that. So about one trillion, 1000,000,000,000 pieces (1000 billion, a million million… a lot!). The refreshing thing about this idea is that it's finally something we as humanity can do to do instead of let. We've heard it countless times: fly less, drive less, eat less meat. Above all, we should stop doing a lot of things. But that doesn't always go well for us. Taking action, we are often better at that. So plant trees!

Plant trees by shopping online

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However, especially in large cities, there are no entire tribes with people who have such green fingers that they plant about twenty trees on their Saturday off. However, TreeClicks has found a digital answer to this.

The concept: with every purchase you make online, in more than fifty thousand affiliated web shops, TreeClicks plants trees on your behalf. Sounds strange? Playful maybe, and creative, but it's dead serious and works like this. TreeClicks works via a plug-in that you install in your browser. Currently, Chrome and Firefox, two of the most widely used browsers, are supported. If you then visit one of the affiliated web stores – and the 'big' stores such as Amazon and Bol.com participate of course – and make a purchase there, that web store pays a small fee to TreeClicks. This fee is then used by TreeClicks to plant trees.

Too good to be true?

Of course that sounds too good to be true, just install a plug-in, order some things on Bol.com and then pretend you are sustainable. Why is that money coming from at all? Why would an online store give that fee?

It works like this: the TreeClicks plug-in does what an online advertisement (for example, a banner) does on an external website. It gives the web store a signal that you have entered through an 'advertisement'. If so, and you then make a purchase, the web store pays a small fee to the website that led the customer, in this case the TreeClicks plug-in. It is the revenue model behind online advertising, but in a disguised form that is good for the climate.

Plant a tree yourself

Plant your own trees

Then we're done, aren't we, if everyone just installs TreeClicks? After all, we do enough online shopping. Unfortunately, we cannot solve the climate crisis with money alone. But TreeClicks is an incredibly genuine, noble concept that definitely deserves more imitation, so be sure to install the plugin and tell your friends, family and colleagues. But we are not there yet. Euros don't plant trees, people still have to do that.

Do you really want to contribute to the fight against climate change? Then plant a tree yourself, because trees are healthy. Not only do they absorb CO2 to convert it into oxygen, but they also provide shelter and provide many animals with a place to build nests or live. Each tree is a source of life and provides a climate in which we humans can thrive. And is it too much work for you to plant trees? Then install at least TreeClicks!

 

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The Bloeise editorial team consists of Thomas Lapperre. These messages are not listed in a personal capacity because they are written by others: hired copywriters for content articles, submitted press releases and sometimes sponsored content. The editors cannot take any responsibility for submitted press releases -[…]
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